Friends of the Wild Flower Garden

upland garden

Now in our 67th year - Dedicated to Protecting, Preserving and Promoting
The interests of The Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden and Bird Sanctuary




Newsletter

Current Issue of The Fringed Gentian™
Summer 2018

Download pdf of printed copy:
Hi resolution 8 mb (best for printing).
Lo resolution - 1.6 mb.


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Web file (HTML): - Phone, tablet, and desktop browser friendly.

Newsletter archive - all back issues.

The Fall 2018 issue will be published in November.


Photo Identification Book of Garden Plants

graphic Spiral bound booklet, 8-1/2 x 5-1/2 inches, 142 pages, thumbnail photos of 437 species of flowering forbs, small shrubs and ferns of the Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden. All plants are native or introduced to Minnesota. Additional 578 images and notes to aid in identification. Photos are approximately 1.5 inches by 2 inches.

In addition, 114 grasses, sedges, large shrubs and trees of the Garden are line listed without photos. Full index. Information about the Garden, the curators and about The Friends. $19.95 plus $3 shipping.

More Details and Order Information


Martha Crone and the Wild Flower Garden

Martha CroneA new book-length sketch of the Garden's second curator and founding member of The Friends. Downloadable low resolution PDF file (12 mb) good for screen viewing, 171 pages - if printed double sided, it is in book format - 8-1/2 x 11 size pages. This file will view correctly in Adobe Reader. A larger high resolution file (42 mb) is available for better print quality
Download lo-res file OR Download hi-res file.


Which Oak is that?

Need help identifing the various Oak tree species in our area. Try our "oak leaf key"

Bur Oak leaf

Garden Plant of the Week

Selected from the many species in, or historical to, the Garden.

Water Smartweed

Water Smartweed
Persicaria amphibia (L.) Gray

Click link on name for information and photos of this plant.

 


Reflections

“At present, in this vicinity, the best part of the land is not private property; the landscape is not owned, and the walker enjoys comparative freedom. But possibly the day will come when it will be partitioned off into so-called pleasure-grounds, in which a few will take a narrow and exclusive pleasure only,—when fences shall be multiplied, and mantraps and other engines invented to confine men to the public road, and walking over the surface of God’s earth shall be construed to mean trespassing on some gentleman’s grounds. To enjoy a thing exclusively is commonly to exclude yourself from the true enjoyment of it. Let us improve our opportunities, then, before the evil days come.” Henry Thoreau, from Walking, 1862.



A Seasonal Poem

'Tis evening; the black snail has got on his track,
And gone to its nest is the wren,
And the packman snail, too, with his home on his back,
Clings to the bowed bents like a wen.

The shepherd has made a rude mark with his foot
Where his shadow reached when he first came,
And it just touched the tree where his secret love cut
Two letters that stand for love's name.

The evening comes in with the wishes of love,
And the shepherd he looks on the flowers,
And thinks who would praise the soft song of the dove,
And meet joy in these dew-falling hours.

For Nature is love, and finds haunts for true love,
Where nothing can hear or intrude;
It hides from the eagle and joins with the dove,
In beautiful green solitude.

"Evening" by
John Clare, English (1793- 1864)



Those Valuable Birches

The Garden once hosted five species of Birch trees. The wetland was once filled with White Birch as the historical photo shows. Learn more how birch canoes were made, Oil of Wintergreen and a Maple Syrup equivalent.

In this article we discuss the very interesting uses of these trees. Birch Beer anyone?

Birch in the wetland