Friends of the Wild Flower Garden

front gate

Now in our 67th year - Dedicated to Protecting, Preserving and Promoting
The interests of The Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden and Bird Sanctuary


Newsletter

Current Issue of The Fringed Gentian™
Summer 2018

Download pdf of printed copy:
Hi resolution 8 mb (best for printing).
Lo resolution - 1.6 mb.


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Newsletter archive - all back issues.

The Fall 2018 issue will be published in November.


Photo Identification Book of Garden Plants

graphic Spiral bound booklet, 8-1/2 x 5-1/2 inches, 142 pages, thumbnail photos of 437 species of flowering forbs, small shrubs and ferns of the Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden. All plants are native or introduced to Minnesota. Additional 578 images and notes to aid in identification. Photos are approximately 1.5 inches by 2 inches.

In addition, 114 grasses, sedges, large shrubs and trees of the Garden are line listed without photos. Full index. Information about the Garden, the curators and about The Friends. $19.95 plus $3 shipping.

More Details and Order Information


Martha Crone and the Wild Flower Garden

Martha CroneA new book-length sketch of the Garden's second curator and founding member of The Friends. Downloadable low resolution PDF file (12 mb) good for screen viewing, 176 pages - if printed double sided, it is in book format - 8-1/2 x 11 size pages. This file will view correctly in Adobe Reader. A larger higher resolution file (21 mb) is available for better print quality
Download lo-res file OR Download hi-res file.


Carl W. Rawson

Carl Rawson This Minnesota impressionist artist and outdoors person was a charter member of The Friends and long-time board member. More Details.


Garden Plant of the Week

Selected from the many species in, or historical to, the Garden.

Prairie Ragwort

Prairie Ragwort
Packera plattensis

Click link on name for information and photos of this plant.

 


Reflections

“When we walk, we naturally go to the fields and woods: what would become of us if we walked only in a garden or a mall? Even some sects of philosophers have felt the necessity of importing the woods to themselves, since they did not go to the woods. “They planted groves and walks of Platanes,” where they took subdiales ambulationes in porticos open to the air. Of course it is of no use to direct our steps to the woods, if they do not carry us thither. I am alarmed when it happens that I have walked a mile into the woods bodily, without getting there in spirit.

In my afternoon walk I would fain forget all my morning occupations and my obligations to society. But it sometimes happens that I cannot easily shake off the village. The thought of some work will run in my head and I am not where my body is—I am out of my senses. In my walks I would fain return to my senses. What business have I in the woods, if I am thinking of something out of the woods? I suspect myself, and cannot help a shudder, when I find myself so implicated even in what are called good works—for this may sometimes happen.” Henry Thoreau, 1862, from Walking.



A Seasonal Poem

THE MURMURING of bees has ceased;
But murmuring of some
Posterior, prophetic,
Has simultaneous come,—

The lower metres of the year,
When nature’s laugh is done,—
The Revelations of the book
Whose Genesis is June.;

"The murmuring of bees" by
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)



Our Valuable Birches

Visual and practical benefits- from paper to beer - are reviewed in this article. In the background of this photo is Eloise Butler's famed 8-boled White Birch.

1926 birch trees